Royal Baths Drown Bowery Ballroom

Opening up for a sold out show with eruptive headliners  like the Dum Dum Girls and Crocodiles sets out towering expectations on a Friday night at Bowery Ballroom. One of the opening acts, a recently migrated San Francisco quartet Royal Baths hyped the energy with their multi-layered screeching guitar rips and liquidating phased vocals, building a brooding wave of ear-candy distortion. A brainchild of shoe-gazing  low-pitched drum progressions and scorching melodic ranges, Royal Baths are a change of taste in the New York horizon.

 

Viktorsha Uliyanova

NXNE Announces 2011 Line Up

North By Northeast (NXNE) recently announced the second wave of bands for the 17th edition of the festival, taking over Toronto June 13-19, 2011. Now confirmed for the event are Devo, Descendents, Stars, The Pharcyde, Men Without Hats, Digable Planets, Twin Shadow, OFF!, Art Brut, Shad, Land of Talk, Chad VanGaalen, and Cults. They join previously announced acts that include The Dodos, Deerhoof, Hot Water Music, The Bouncing Souls, and Anti-Flag, Dum Dum Girls and others.

All NXNE Festival passes and wristbands are now on sale, available at www.nxne.com. Early-bird pricing for NXNE Priority Passes is available through April 25. And, the complete NXNE Music line-up and schedule, NXNE Film schedule and additional NXNE Interactive programming will be announced over the next few weeks. Stay tuned!

Girls Names Premiere New Video, Release New Album April 26th


Belfast trio, Girls Names, owe a great deal of debt to 80’s and early 90’s goth-pop acts such as Black Tambourine, Felt and the Sound of Young Scotland. While not the first band to incorporate such influences, Girls Names still manage to carve out a sizable niche while sharing the stage with such notables as Times New Viking, Dum Dum Girls, and Abe Vigoda. Their new album, Dead To Me, was recorded in the latter half of 2010 and is set to be released April 26th on Slumberland Records. Check out the first single, “Bury Me.”

Girls Names
Dead To Me
(Slumberland Records)
Street Date: Apr. 26, 2011

1. Lawrence
2. I Could Die
3. When You Cry
4. No More Words
5. Nothing More To Say
6. I Lose
7. Cut Up
8. Bury Me
9. The Kiss Goodbye
10. Séance on a Wet Afternoon

Girls Names – Bury Me from stereogum on Vimeo.

NYC Weekly Show Roundup!

Cassette Kids, At Sea, Phone Home @ S.O.B.’s

Florence and the Machine, The Smith Westerns @ Terminal 5

Dum Dum Girls, Frankie Rose & The Outs @ Music Hall of Williamsburg
*CANCELED*

Shout Out Out Out Out, Free Blood @ (le) poisson rogue

Clinic, The Fresh & Onlys, Girls at Dawn @ Bowery Ballroom

Joemca, Bird Love, Recess Brooklyn @ Cake Shop

Ava Luna, Spanish Prisoners, Data Dog, Can’t Tell @ Glasslands

Florence and the Machine, The Smith Westerns @ Terminal 5

Black Mountain, The Black Angels @ Bowery Ballroom

Shout Out Out Out Out @ Glasslands

The Dears, Zeus @ Knitting Factory

Bettie Serveert, The Art of Shooting @ Maxwell’s

Shilpa Ray & Her Happy Hookers, Hooray for Earth, Zambri, Arpline @ Pianos

The Duke Spirit, The Rassle @ Santos Party House

The Fresh  & Onlys, Royal Baths, X-Ray Eyeballs @ Shea Stadium

Wolf Parade, Ogre You Asshole @ The Wellmont Theatre

Blonde Redhead, Pantha Du Prince @ Webster Hall

Matt Costa, Everest @ Bowery Ballroom

Shark?, Roo, Byrds of Paradise, Dinosaur Feathers @ Bruar Falls

Bob Mould, Lenny Kaye @ City Winery

The Dears, Himalaya @ Knitting Factory

The Black Angels, Black Mountain @ Music Hall of Williamsburg

The Script, Joshua Radin @ Terminal 5

Blonde Redhead, Pantha Du Prince @ Webster Hall

Bob Mould, Marshall Crenshaw @ Citery Winery

Freelance Whales, Miniature Tigers @ Maxwell’s

Matt Costa, Everest, Boy & Bear @ Music Hall of Williamsburg

The Script, Joshua Radin @ Terminal 5

The Dandy Warhols, Blue Giant @ The Bell House

Interpol, White Rabbits @ United Palace Theatre

Dawes, Vetiver, Peter Wolf Crier @ Webster Hall

Frankie Rose and the Outs – ‘Frankie Rose and the Outs’


Frankie Rose and the Outs’ self-titled debut album is at one point an artful, nearly abstract collection of sketches and at another point a nearly arch exploration of the modern synthesis of girl group sounds and gossamer strands of various ‘gaze’ and art rock entities. The band leader of the all girl group, Frankie Rose, has been in various Brooklyn bands such as Vivian Girls, Crystal Stilts and the Dum Dum Girls and, while the album is closer to those faux-beach blanket bingo bands, there is enough of the aforementioned abstractions that Frankie Rose and the Outs operate less in songs and more in emotions and tones captured.

It feels easy to throw together touch points like Phil Spector, shoe-gaze, shit-gaze, beach bands, and the faux-surf sound that was popular last year, but there is a modulation and tonality added to the songs as pads dampen the sounds of aggressive-if-not-wholly-formed guitar lines snaking in and out of the foreground of the tracks as chimes, organs and keys accent back beats to create a near dizzying slumbering piece of near-occult Americana.

The words aren’t important as most songs have only snatches of lines stolen and presented for mood as they’re artfully blended beneath the expansive wide-screen production. However, there is the question of how much of this record can be presented live, where the artful techniques are more difficult to replicate.

Tucked between these explorations are some damn fine songs though. “Memo”, which begins with the barest of guitars before rhythm and chants of “bum ba da bum”; all of it fading back to the guitar before coming back for a strong noisy climax that carries a strong ‘rum-a-tum’ militant edge. It’s the barest of songs; there’s barely enough there to even call it a sketch. It’s like a pair of curved lines bending to intersect before they casually move apart. However, there is some depth to this, the strongest “song” on the album.

These plain pop songs may be less interesting, but they are no less strong. They’re upbeat and catchy despite the lyrics often being indeterminate, so it’s like listening to foreign language pop songs filtered through the past three years of Brooklyn music.

This is actually as good a descriptor as any for this first album. Frankie Rose has managed to capture a moment in time, frozen in amber whose sharp edges have been rounded off by time, distance, and liberally-applied, soft-focused, hazy nostalgia. This is a strange beast, but a beautiful one.