Oklahoma’s Trio Psychotic Reaction Out and About in Brooklyn

At a time when it is challenging to seek out bands hailing from regions outside of the musical mecca of NYC, Oklahoma-based  group Psychotic Reaction bring forward progressive and mind-numbing sounds.  The band crosses the traditional barriers of garage rock and psychedelic tunes and reintroduces subcultural drones of Lou Reed and the Stooges.  While their instruments aggregate a concoction of multi-layered guitar snarls, the group constructs a type of narcotic energy that makes the listeners believe and remember the power of rock and roll.PR3

PR1

Find them on Facebook:

http://www.facebook.com/psychoticreactionband?ref=br_tf

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The Life and Times Play Bell House

The following are additional visual nibblers of the rockers The Life and Times who jammed at the Bell House alongside Local H’s frontman Scott Lucas.

All photos by Skyler Smith

 

Scott Lucas Slams Down During His Solo Show

It’s been a long haul with Hurricane Sandy hitting New York, disconnecting electricity and internet for many residents, including the editors here, at Modern Mystery. However, we have prepared some pulsating images from Scott Lucas’s October show at Brooklyn’s Bell House, check them out below! 

Royal Baths Drown Bowery Ballroom

Opening up for a sold out show with eruptive headliners  like the Dum Dum Girls and Crocodiles sets out towering expectations on a Friday night at Bowery Ballroom. One of the opening acts, a recently migrated San Francisco quartet Royal Baths hyped the energy with their multi-layered screeching guitar rips and liquidating phased vocals, building a brooding wave of ear-candy distortion. A brainchild of shoe-gazing  low-pitched drum progressions and scorching melodic ranges, Royal Baths are a change of taste in the New York horizon.

 

Viktorsha Uliyanova

CMJ Diary: Wednesday October 20th

By Sedera Ranaivoarinosy

Not to going to go into detail, but my life has never been busier. Still, I decided this year I would let it affect my CMJ time as little as possible. Sure, for these first few days, that means no day parties for me, but hey, there’s plenty for me to see at night. So here’s a little run through of last night:

1. Pujol at Santos Party House

Pujol @ Santos, Oct. 20th, 2011

After almost going in the wrong entrance–two shows were happening at the same time–I make it inside Santos while the members of the band are finishing up their mic checks. Not to be stereotypical but Pujol‘s garage rock is not necessarily the type of music you’d necessarily expect to hear out of Nashville, TN. The club was at that point where there are quite a few people around but it’s not so full that you are squished into everyone so the vibe was welcoming but it was maybe still a bit early for a rager. Nonetheless, Pujol brought it: the bass made the ground under my feet shake and I caught myself checking if someone was texting me because the waves of sound were making my jacket vibrate. Cute note: Daniel Pujol ended the set mentioning that it was his sister’s birthday. It didn’t seem like she was in the audience but if I had had that set dedicated to me, I’d be pretty happy.

Next stop was Pianos. On the train over, I saw a contestant from the dance competition So You Think You Can Dance. It felt like an odd intrusion of the mainstream into my evening of indie takeover.

2. Cloud Nothings and Exitmusic at Pianos

Cloud Nothings @ Pianos, Oct. 20th, 2011

Going from Pujol to Cloud Nothings (if you subtract the subway ride from Santos to Pianos) made for a fairly seamless transition, although the Cleveland outfit could have used the clarity of sound Pujol enjoyed at Santos. Needless to say, my ears might not really ever function the same again but that didn’t ruin their performance per se. In fact, there was something kind of pleasant in the way the songs sounded and the flow of the band’s set. From one track to the next, I felt like I was going back through all the various stages of adolescence: the pop-punk “rebel” phase, followed by the angsty, more “hard rock” one and the more exploratory one, represented by more experimental and noisy sounds. Since these days I live running from place to place without much breathing time, that little bit of nostalgic energy was pretty comforting. But next time, I’ll be careful not to stay as close to the speakers.

Exitmusic @ Pianos, Oct. 20th, 2011

The second Exitmusic started playing, the pace changed immediately. While the music I’d heard until then was immediate and very raw, this was carefully calculated and orchestrated. It was obvious from the moment the band stepped on stage; their polished appearance was a long way away from the torn t-shirts and plain old jeans of the previous bands. In some way, it was almost a little intimidating to see how attractive everyone was in the band but bit by bit, that feeling faded away as the music and Aleksa Palladino’s haunting vocals shrouded the room. As the set built up, it was like we were all suspended mid-air, as if carried by the lofty guitars. And then Cold War Kids’ “Hang Me Up To Dry” started playing as they took off their instruments and it was back to reality where class the next day meant no more shows for that night.

Clap Your Hands Say Yeah Hurricane Through Ace Hotel

 

Kicking off CMJ with their adroit-charged energy, the Brooklyn-based voyagers Clap Your Hand Say Yeah packed the walls of Ace Hotel on Wednesday afternoon hours before their performance. The band chewed out a compressed thirty-minute set,feeding their fans a combination of pieces from their most recent release Hysterical, as well as transcending back to “ In This Home On Ice” from their debut album and of course, a hit from Some Loud Thunder. CYHSY finished their set with “Satan Said Dance”, where the keyboardist, Robbie Guertin switched gears and teamed up with the drummer to spit out turbulent beats to end the show.

 

***Set List***

Same Mistake

Maniac

 

Misspent Youth

Hysterical

Ketamine and Ecstasy

In This Home On Ice

Said Said Dance

 

Viktorsha Uliyanova