“Give Some, Get Some” is the Rock Jam Tune of from Mitch Melodia

Mitch Melodia is the artist and mastermind behind the jam “band” Alpha Pegasi whose sound is rock and some pop mentality with a lot of chilled out Led Zeppelin as an influence. “Alpha Pegasi has a Tame Impala-ish approach in the studio and a Phish-ish mentality for live shows,” says Mitch. “Improvisation extending songs is a staple of every show but when recording, I keep it concise. It’s fun for me to play and arrange every instrument on record, but I’m also stoked for future collaborations with other musicians in the studio.”

His recently released alternative rock single “Give Some, Get Some” has a Red Hot Chili Peppers vibe with bluesy undertones. The melody is precise and method, giving the hook a permanent place in your head. Mitch started writing it in 2013 and has been tweaking and working the song ever since to finally be what it is today, a funky, danceable, and groove-filled jam song.

“With groovy and funky verses, a more rock-heavy and catchy chorus, and a couple of firey guitar solos, ‘Give Some, Get Some’ is one of my favorites on the first EP,” shares Mitch. He has musical solos, funky versus, rock chorus’s and was made for a live setting.

Listen here:

A main financial focus for Alpha Pegasi is to donate 5% of all profits to environmental and health-orientated organizations like San Diego EarthWorks. Mitch aspires to use his music and art as a vehicle to support environmental and health-improving causes, including mental-health practices. 

Connect with Mitch Melodia via:
Website // Instagram // Facebook // Twitter // YouTube // Spotify // Soundcloud

Natalie Fideler and Her Trio Release the Bluesy Rock Single “Three Man Army”

Natalie Fideler is the front-person of her self-titled power trio currently based in Minneapolis, MN. Having performed in several different ensembles over the years, the release of her debut album “Steak & Eggs” marks the beginning of her solo career. Her band consists of herself as the songwriter on guitar, keyboards, and lead vocals, Hailey Jacobsen on bass, and Leigh Underwood on drums.

The trio just released their newest single, “Three Man Army,” the title track of their next album of the same name. While their previous single, “Judas,” had more of an alternative rock sound and contemplated the Christian Religion and what that means to Natalie, “Three Man Army” is more fun. The song has a funk and blues element to it and is carried by Natalie’s vocals which are beautiful and passionate, giving off a softer Demi Lovato or a Hayley Williams vibe. 

“Three Man Army” utilizes the trumpet, giving the melody a catchy sound that makes you want to get up and dance. The song is the first one Natalie had ever written, way back when she was 14 years old. It’s Natalie speaking to a dear friend she had just had a falling out with (and herself in a symbolic way) trying to figure out who she is and who she wants to be. She sings “There’s plenty of people out there just like me/messed up, broken, incomplete,” giving a sense of empowerment and inner conflict.

“I eventually retired the song when I was in college thinking it ‘sounded too young’ and I was sick of it,” shares Natalie. “But one day many years later, I was doing a pandemic livestream concert from my living room and my fiance/drummer Leigh heard me play the song for the first time. Once I had finished the tune she said to me (verbatim because the stream is archived), ‘Question. Is there a reason that we’re not playing that one full band?! What’s wrong with you?! It’s a great song, it’s funky. Why aren’t we doing it full band?!’ I thankfully decided to bring the song back.” 

Listen here:

Connect with Natalie Fideler via:

Website // Instagram // Facebook // Twitter // YouTube // Spotify // Soundcloud

Angela Perry’s New Album is Beyond Beautiful

Angela Perry’s music shares the strength, heartache and joys of living life. Her melodies are invigorated with energy and honesty and her lyrics are beautifully crafted and meticulously written to be as open as possible. Her soulful voice takes her music to a higher lever as you can not only hear her passion for her craft, but for the meaning behind each song as well. Her songwriting gives a new perspective to the typical themes of nature and matters of the heart that we all know and love.

Angela newest folk and country rock album, 21 Dayz, boasts 9 stunning songs that showcase her Shania Twain and Bonnie Rait-esque vocals and her Joni Mitchell and James Taylor-like songwriting. She meticulously wrote each song to be as open and no-nonsense as possible. She doesn’t sugar-coat through any topics. For example, her song “Sister Cry” is about the disturbing amount of women who are murdered and go missing just for being their authentic selves. In fact, indigenous women are 10x more likely to get murdered or go missing. The lyrics of this song is juxtaposed with the more upbeat melody, implying our blind eye towards this. “’Sister Cry’ was written from the victim’s perspective as a plea to all of us ‘who look the other way.’ The word WHY in the song asks a question that can not seem to be answered not only by the victims but by us.  They are crying for all who too blinded to see,” shares Angela.

Her song “Sunflower Child,” by far one of her best, is about strength, hope, and positivity. The sunflower is a resilient and adaptable flower as it can grow in any environment. She recently released the video for this song and dedicated it to the Ukrainian refugees. The song is about perseverance and standing tall against adversity, like a sunflower.

“Fallen” is another song that stands out. It’s more acoustic than the rest and represents everyone who has fallen from grace due to a decision they made. It hurts now, but time heals all wounds. The melody is both haunting and a little melancholic, though you can hear the hope in her voice as the song progresses. “The song was written underneath 150 year old cottonwood trees where the idea of time is so different from what we as humans feel,” shares Angela. “In the scheme of time, we are nothing more than just a speck and sometimes when we fail to see how things we view as significant are not. This song…reminds all of us that we are human and have human frailties and frustrations.”

Listen to the full album here:

Find Angela Perry via:

Website // Instagram // Facebook // Twitter // YouTube // TikTok // Spotify // Soundcloud

He is Storming Through the Barricades and Sending Us into a Euphoric State

Stormin’ Norman Zamcheck is a pianist and singer/songwriter. He has been writing songs since he was old enough to pick out a tune on the keyboard and write down the lyrics on his mother’s linen napkins. During the course of his four-decade career, Norm has penned over five hundred musical compositions.

A New York transplant, Norm hales from the Boston area. He has performed in venues up and down the East and West coasts as well as internationally. In the late 70’s his band, Stormin’ Norman & Suzy, was referred to by the New York Times as the “hottest act in town, ” unleashing a deluge of media attention. Since then, Norman has played Carnegie Hall (twice); recorded for the Polydor/Polygram label; written scores for several movies and off-Broadway shows, appeared on a Dick Clark TV Special and worked as composer and music director for Pilobolous Dance Theater. He also toured with the Andy Statman Klezmer Orchestra, playing to appreciative crowds in Poland, Israel and Brooklyn.

As a composer of songs, Norman Zamcheck has been praised in publications from Rolling Stone Magazine to The New York Times, which called him “exceptionally good and exceptionally original.” Early on, Norm drew writing inspiration from a rich tradition of folk music. Over the passing years he harkened to personal muses such as Mose Allison, Randy Newman and Tom Lehrer. Like them, he brilliantly fuses melody, wit, humor and irony. He sees songs in terms of “novellas” and populates his tunes with amusing characters, memorable stories and rich allusions to nature and humanity (see Music Tree page). Stormin’ Norman’s music rocks with a blues/New Orleans beat; his unique sound as a hard-driving pianist has been described as boogie woogie meets twelve tone. His primary pianistic influences include Fats Waller, Thelonious Monk and Dr. John.

To support his growing family Norm stopped performing regularly in mid-career to become an inner-city teacher and principal . Once he retired from education, he has caught up for lost time and booked himself gigs from the Shenandoah Valley in the South to the piney woods of Maine; from the Berkshires in Massachusetts to Boston; New York to Los Angeles; and across the pond in Paris. His new release, “Euphoria” blends Latin jazz with boogie and rock and roll. 

The sounds of reminiscent past of smokey old piano bars laced with the happiness of yesterday we all wish we could feel again. The song “Queen of Rosebuds” really plays to a modern Broadway jazz sound that has edgy sensual notes. The song “Everything is Turning (On the Wings of Love) is a beautiful lulllaby-esque song filled with hopeful notes to create a beautiful melody. Norm does a fantastic job at creating a moving piece of music that is eclectic and yet still all speaks the same language. On this record, Norm has cultivated a pianistic style rooted in the jazz of New Orleans with shades of Latin influence. Simultaneously nostalgic, Euphoria is a totally unique sound. The album reflects the driving rhythms of the rock ensembles he toured with for years around the Northeast. Real Stormin’ Norman is an ensemble fronted by the thundering vocals of Genevieve Faivre and features a stellar group of sidemen, including rising jazz superstar Jonathan Saraga (trumpet and arrangements), Russian bass master Arthur Sadowsky and drummer Tobias Ralph, who is acclaimed as “one of the best drummers in America” by Drummers World. Real Stormin’ Norman calls New York City home and is currently touring Euphoria around the Big Apple.

Norm states “Euphoria is the perfection I’ve always wanted to do. The songs are beautiful. The singing is powerful. Tight, imaginative arrangements. This album is way more realized than the previous Real Stormin’ Norman records. We were able to perfect music that I had been working on for years.” 

Listen to Euphoria here:

Additionally, Norman found time to score a long-forgotten Nicholas Ray movie that has been locked in a vault for decades called We Can’t Go Home Again. And with the urging of Ray’s widow, Susan, Norm also scored a documentary about the legendary auteur film director. Both films were screened internationally and featured several times on the Turner Cable Classic network.

Find Real Stormin’ Norman via:
Website // Instagram // Facebook // YouTube // Spotify // Soundcloud

About to Explode with The Deep Vibration

The Deep Vibration is one of our favorite up and coming new bands here at Modern Mystery, so when the band rolled into town on their co-headlining tour with Roman Candle we were really excited to see what they had to offer live. No lie, The Deep Vibration is one of the best live bands out there today. Singer Matt Campbell is literally an explosion of energy on stage. This is one band we can’t wait to hear more of and keep the name in mind, because they are on the verge of being huge real soon.

We had the opportunity of sitting down with Matt to talk about everything from their press exposure to how they got their infamous name.

How did the band form?

Matt Campbell: Uh, Andy and I went to college together and we started playing guitars together. And then when that band fell through years ago, two and a half years ago we met Luke who was from Australia and had traveled the world with some pretty big bands. We met Adam….well Luke joined the band in December 2007, it will still a different band kind of. Then this time last year Adam showed up as our bass player. I had seen him play, and we needed a bass player because the guy that we had parted ways, and that’s how we met Adam.

How do you go from Australia to Nashville?

MC: Yea he was playing for another band on drums.

You obviously have blues and rock and roll mixed into your sound. When push comes to shove, which one do you prefer?

MC: I like them both, I think of them as the same.

There’s a pretty big story how you got your name, how did it come about?

MC: We needed a band name because ours (The Attack) was taken, and we went to Walmart and flipped through um, like cheap novels and the Deep Vibration was what we went with.  (long pause). I’m just kidding! (laughs). So we went to a show at the Ryman and Lou Reed was playing and we were like ‘Well  Lou is going to have a good name for us!’ After the show we hung around the back. It’s great if ya’ll ever come to Nashville, there’s a great alleyway between the Ryman and Broadway kind of. Have you ever been there?

No I haven’t!

MC: Well there’s this great alleyway and it smells like garbage, because its like where they dump the garbage.  So that’s where that came in and Lou came out to sign autographs and everybody is crowded around him and then I was in the back and said ‘Lou! I need a band name!’ and he kind of kept signing records and then a while passed and he looked up and he said ‘Deep Vibration,’ and we said ‘Thank you!’ and we just kind of hung out and after he finished signing records and stuff he walked up to me and talked a bit then got in his taxicab.

That’s a great way to get a name! When does the first full length come out?

MC: We don’t have  a date. Probably….there’s no date. Maybe. By this time next year it will be out, definitely.

How do you feel about the success of the ‘Veracruz’ EP? There has been a lot of talk about it through magazines and blogs.

MC: I don’t like reading those things, and its great when people like it.  I’d rather not, I don’t know. I think it sounds good and I like the songs on it, and I think the guys put a lot of love into it. They did a great job. It’s different from a lot of the records…because, well it is. So I feel like its great and I couldn’t be happier with it. There’s a few wobbles in it, but it works well with the record. That stuff is just what works.

What made you decide to record the album on an 8-track?

MC: Computers are horrible and they can destroy beautiful things. Tape machines have a soul too and a heart. Technology can be self reliable but you can’t put you’re blood in it and rock and roll needs that.

I find that often, digital can be very cold.

MC: Yea, people can just get very over analytical and end up changing lots of things. I can’t go back and cut and paste on a tape machine. You can’t argue with it.

How did you get Gillian (mistakenly pronounced ‘Jillian’) to perform on your record?

MC: Gillian? That’s okay! (laughs) You’re a big fan I guess! (laughs) We went to one of her shows. I saw a great show in high school, she played at this place called The Station Inn in Nashville and on St. Patrick’s Day everyone was drinking green  beer and getting drunk. I met her there. My Dad has the same guitar as her and I showed it to her and talker to her a bit. I  had it in my car.

How does the songwriting process occur for the band? Is it a collaborative effort or does everyone bring in their own songs?

MC: It can happen anyway. So far I’ve written the songs in guitar, song lyrics, music, but I don’t write their parts. They bring it into the song, then it sort of pans out.

This is your first extensive tour. How has it been going so far? Are there any weird tour stories yet?

MC: I don’t know!(laughs) Its going alright, its funny being on tour.

Has being on the road lived up to your expectations of what it would be?

MC: Sure! (laughs) I’m not sure what I expected it to be!

Our friends are on tour camping in tents in random places right now.

MC: Yea, people do that!

You get compared to Jeff Tweedy and Wilco a lot. Is that flattering or do you find it annoying?

MC: Jeff Tweedy? I don’t get that very much!

In the review I’ve read you do!

MC: Oh really, I don’t read them! I like Jeff Tweedy a lot. That’s strange.

How would you describe The Deep Vibration’s sound?

MC: Its’ try to keep it simple. It’s a simple sound but there are holes in it. Like a live show there is only four of us so there are a lot of gaps I think.

Which do you prefer, being in the studio or playing live?

MC: I like them both. I really like playing live shows especially when they’re situated right. Like when you get good sound and all that stuff, but I like playing anywhere. Tonight’s venue (Piano’s) was small!

And awkwardly shaped!

MC: Yea its really small. I had like an inch of stage. I really love the studio but I’m ready to hang out for a while.

How did you get signed to Dualtone Records?

MC: We played a show and Paul Roper (of Dualtone) came to it. That was like February of last year. Well, the story goes like a friend of ours was interning at Dualtone and she was playing a CD of ours and they were curious as to what it was. Paul came to  a show we played and then we gave, well…we  blackmailed them (jokingly laughs) I forgot you had a tape recorder! (laughs)  I guess they liked us, our songs and music. We didn’t have a bass player.

Paul Roper of Dualtone (who was present during the interview): The first time I saw them they had a bass player with a huge afro and I said ‘We got a character here!’ but he had other things going on and Adam filled in and it was a great live show. That’s what sold me.

What is the first instrument that you learned how to play?

MC: Oh geez! Bass guitar. I never learned how to play it. I got it though. Guitar I guess.

If you weren’t in The Deep Vibration, what would you be doing?

MC: I’d be in The Attack!

Where do you see the band in 10 years from now?

MC: I see us with a few records out, playing shows. I see myself playing guitar, I see Jeremy playing guitar, Adam playing bass and Luke on drums. Just playing shows, recording a lot of songs, getting really good. I’m really excited about it. The next year is going to be a big year, a really big year for everything. What are you going to be doing?

I don’t even know what I’m doing tomorrow!

MC: You got to get it together! (laughs)

Final question of the night, what board game can you kick anyone’s ass at?

MC: Monopoly. Its a game of chance. I like the top hat.

CHECK OUT THE DEEP VIBRATION ON THEIR MYSPACE

Check Out More Photos from The Deep Vibration’s Show at Piano’s AFTER THE JUMP